Self-Assessment

Welcome to the Sustainability Self-Assessment.

The Facility Self-Assessment Tool  is a straightforward but robust questionnaire used to evaluate a manufacturer's performance against a wide array of sustainability metrics.

For your facility to make a measurable improvement in its sustainability performance, you will need to have a sense of where you are today, in order to compare where you’ll be tomorrow. 

The Facility Self-Assessment Tool allows you to:
Assess your own sustainability performance in the four areas of sustainability: strategic governance, environment, economic and social. 
Benchmark your performance against industry peers in the food and beverage industry.
Identify your strengths and potential gaps in your sustainability performance. 

For each question, users are  scored zero to three points depending on how the question is answered, using the scale outlined below.  

The tool uses a four-point assessment scale (0-3) as follows:

0 No: Have not started this task
1 Have started initial and conceptual planning work
2 Have begun to implement this task
3 Yes: Have fully implemented or completed this task

When all the questions have been answered, a percentage score is tabulated on the Results page to provide you a general indication of how your facility scored in each of the four areas of sustainability including the 18 subcategories, and how your score compares to your food and beverage manufacturing peers. 

We suggest conducting the Facility Self-Assessment every six months in the first year and on an annual basis from then on.    

Important Notes:

  • This tool is targeted toward a facility (not corporate), and thus should be answered from the perspective of an individual facility.
  • If you are an industry stakeholder (not a manufacturer) create a Test Facility in your MyProfile page to experiment with the tool.


This tool was developed by NSF-GFTC and BLOOM.

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Adapted and updated from: Willard, 2005 and Freeman et al, 2000